Ideas for Picking the Greatest Dollhouses

March 4, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Dollhouse

Virtually  every little girl adores dollhouses, but you may  well be nervous when it comes to choosing  the best one for your child. You may  know about the large array available, but maybe  you do not know how to pick just one. Think about  some of the following tips before you buy a dollhouse  for a girl of any age.

One of the most  important duties is to ensure the safety of the  child who will use the dollhouse the most. If  your kid is a toddler, you know that she probably  likes to explore new objects by trying  to eat them. Obviously, this may be a safety hazard,  and since lots of dollhouses include very small  pieces, you should take size into consideration before you purchase.  The bigger the dolls and furniture, the better.  However, that does not mean that the dollhouse has to  be equally large. Most small kids do not notice  the details as much as older children, so you should buy a miniature  house that includes just a few rooms. As long as a few larger  dolls and minimal furniture fits, your youngster will probably  be busy playing with the toy for hours.

On the other hand, if your  child is a bit older, she will likely prefer attention to detail. Clearly,  once she is past the phase of attempting to eat little  toys, the dollhouse can be any size. Several older girls  like large dollhouses, but they are typically more  detailed than the ones meant for toddlers. They usually  have several more rooms that are smaller in size, meaning that  more dolls and furniture will fit. This means that  your kid will be kept busy for hours taking in every aspect  that the new dollhouse boasts.

Many dollhouses are good at stimulating  the imagination. However, some can help it along with modern  technology. Several dollhouses can be lit up once they  are plugged in or supported by batteries. This can be amazing  to children who do not expect much realism in their make  believe world. Some also feature sounds that can amuse  children, such as music, talking, and common  household sounds.

You could  also reflect on whether you think your child  might be interested in passing the dollhouse on to her children.  A low-priced, plastic house may be acceptable  if you expect her to grow out of it soon, but as she gets  older, you might consider buying a more traditional  dollhouse that will last. Such houses are typically stately,  with porcelain or glass items and dolls. They are more for  show and collecting than heavy use, but your child  might appreciate such beauty in the bedroom for years  to come. Just make sure that is something your child  would be interested in before you purchase.

Before buying,  consider what your kid would most value. Attempt  to think about a few years in the future, not just currently,  especially if you plan to spend a good amount  of money. Dollhouses often last a lifetime, which is why  putting some consideration into selecting the best  one possible now is advised.

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Ideas for Picking the Greatest Dollhouses

Author:

Tim Stephens

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com

Knitting Ideas And Help Steeking

January 27, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Knitting

This article gives you some great knitting ideas on Steeking. Originally developed as a method of knitting in the Shetland Archipelago and used with the Fair Isle style of knitting, Steeking has become a popular method for knitting. Steeking allows a garment to be created in much larger sections without the added hassle of having to knit from the right side (the front of the garment) and the wrong side (the inside of the garment) making the knitting process faster and easier for many people.

Effectively, what you will be doing is knitting the garment in one piece using the tubular or circular knitting and not stopping to create all of the holes for sleeves, necklines or other holes. Steeking is especially popular for overly complex patterns that have numerous bobbles (or added stitches to create an additional design with the perception of depth with added thickness to the garment by using additional stitches) or are otherwise overly complex and difficult to follow even from a single side.

The actual steek that you make will be knitted in to your garment where the holes will eventually go. The steek is made by the addition of extra stitches that serve to bind the knitting together when the garment opening is cut into the fabric. This will prevent the knitted garment from unraveling while you are working on it when it is time to add the holes into your knitted garment.

When you have cut out the hole for your garment, you have a few different options depending on what works best for you. Generally your added stitches can be added to and you can continue to knit the entire garment without having to do any additional sewing or ribbing to create seams. In other words, you can create what appears for all intents and purposes, to be a completely seamless garment. On the wrong side of the garment, any loose ends can easily be knitted into the rest of the garment so that they do not show. As long as you use a measure of caution and are careful, this will not create any excessive “bulk” inside the knitted garment to create any discomfort for the individual wearing the knitted garments.

If you would like to, you can create seams with ribbing or even the addition of some creative cable knitting so that you have a discernible yet decorative seam. You still may have some loose ends to tie up inside the steek itself though but again, that can be stitched into the wrong side of the garment with little trouble and still be both comfortable and beautiful when it is worn.

Finally, if you would like to, you can create the sleeves or other attachments separately and either knit or sew them into the finished garment. One of the greatest benefits of steeking is that the knit stitches are not very likely to begin unraveling if you have bridged them properly. This means that your options really are open but if you do feel more comfortable creating the other pieces separately, you still have the option of sewing or knitting them in to finish the garment but you will not have to make a decision until you finish the main garment itself. Again, one of the most common uses for this process is with overly complex patterns that already have a lot of design added in to them, the rest as they say, is up to you though and depends on your own knitting ideas. Of course it also depends on your knitting skills and what you are both comfortable with and enjoy.

Liz Raad is a small business coach and author of the exciting new E-book “Knitting For Profit – Your Step-by-Step Guide To Making Money From Knitting and Crochet”.

If you love knitting and crochet and have ever wished you could make money from it then make sure you visit Liz’s popular knitting for profit blog where you will find tonnes of free information, practical advice and knitting ideas on how to turn your knitting hobby into real cash.

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Knitting Ideas And Help Steeking

Author:

Liz Raad

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com

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